Cardiac Interventional Procedures

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An interventional procedure is a non-surgical treatment used to open narrowed coronary arteries to improve blood flow to the heart. Interventional procedures are not considered to be surgical procedures because there is no large incision used to open the chest, and the recovery time from catheterization is much shorter than that of surgery.

An interventional procedure can be performed during a diagnostic cardiac catheterization when a blockage is identified, or it may be scheduled after a catheterization has confirmed the presence of coronary artery disease.

Interventional Procedures that Treat Blocked Arteries

Balloon angioplasty - a procedure in which a small balloon at the tip of the catheter is inserted near the blocked or narrowed area of the coronary artery. In most cases, balloon angioplasty is performed with stenting. A stent is a small, metal mesh tube that acts as a scaffold to provide support inside the coronary artery. 

Coronary artery stent placement

Chronic Total Occlusion PCI (Percutaneous Coronary Intervention) - a procedure that treats severe blockages (99% or higher) of coronary arteries

Watch the video below to hear Dr. Henry Meltser explain the benefits of Chronic Total Occlusion PCI. 

Interventional Procedures that Treat Irregular Heart Rhythms

Abnormal heart rates or rhythms can now be treated with catheter-based non-surgical procedures. 

EP Study - An EP study is a non-surgical procedure that studies the cardiac electrical system to help diagnose and treat heart rhythm disorders (arrhythmias). The test involves inserting catheters into a blood vessel in your wrist or groin and guiding it to your heart with the aid of a special X-ray machine. The electrode catheters used during the EP study are long, flexible wires that carry electrical impulses to and from the heart. These electrode catheters are used to record the electrical signals generated by the heart and to pace the heart. By recording and pacing from strategic locations within the heart, the cardiologist is able use this controlled environment to locate and diagnose the cause of the arrhythmia.

Radiofrequency Ablation - Radiofrequency ablation uses an electrode catheter to destroy the abnormal electrical tissue causing the arrhythmia. 

Cardioversion - Cardioversion delivers an electrical shoc to the heart to convert an irregular or fast heart rhythm to a normal heart rhythm. 

Pacemaker Implants - Some types of abnormal heart rhythms can only be treated effectively with an artificial pacemaker. The latest technology in pacemakers offer models that weigh only about 1.5 ounces and contain a lithium battery that can last up to 10 years. The pacemaker unit is implanted surgically beneath the skin just below the collarbone on the right side of the chest. 

Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICD's) Implants - ICD's are small automatic devices that can detect and treat arrhythmias in patients with ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation, where the heart beats dangerously fast. Today's device consists of a generator slightly smaller than the size of a wallet attached to electrode catheters. The defribillator is surgically placed under or over chest or abdominal muscles, and the catheters are threaded through veins to permanent positions in the heart. The implanted defribillator monitors the heart rhythm and automatically detects and treats abnormal rhythm with electrical shock.

Loop Recorder Insertion - The implantable loop recorder, smaller than a pack of gum, is inserted just beneath the skin in the upper chest area. The recorder continuously monitors the rate and rhythm of the heart 24 hours a day.  Episodes of fainting and other symptoms are recorded and can be played back later for detailed analysis.

Interventional Procedures for Replacing Aortic Valves

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) - TAVR is used to treat patients with severe aortic stenosis – a narrowing of the heart’s aortic valve – who are too sick for traditional heart surgery. During the procedure, a small catheter is used to place a new aortic valve within the damaged valve to more effectively regulate blood flow in the heart. 

Percutaneous Closure for PFO in Patients with Stroke

Closure of an abnormal opening between the left and right atria (upper chambers) of the heart.

Catholic Health Locations

Mercy Hospital of Buffalo
565 Abbott Road
Buffalo, NY 14220
Phone & Hours

Mount St. Mary's Hospital
5300 Military Road
Lewiston, NY 14092
Phone & Hours

Physicians & Providers Affiliated with Catholic Health

Ashish Bhatia, MD
Ashish Bhatia, MD
Cardiology, Electrophysiology
Male
James G. Conley, MD
James G. Conley, MD
Cardiology, Cardiology - Interventional
Male
Currently accepting new patients
Joseph L. Gelormini, MD
Joseph L. Gelormini, MD
Cardiology - Interventional
Male
Nadeem U. Haq, MD
Nadeem U. Haq, MD
Cardiology, Cardiology - Interventional
Male
Currently accepting new patients
Ali Masud, MD
Ali Masud, MD
Cardiology, Cardiology - Interventional
Male
Currently accepting new patients
Henry M. Meltser, MD
Henry M. Meltser, MD
Cardiology, Cardiology - Interventional
Male
Currently accepting new patients
Kishor V. Phadke, MD
Kishor V. Phadke, MD
Cardiology, Cardiology - Interventional
Male
Currently accepting new patients

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